Martin Scorsese Directing Style

Martin Scorsese is a famous and talented American director who is recognized for directing many well known movies such as Goodfellas and The Wolf of Wallstreet. His movies all have one thing in common, which is the fairly similar directing styles he implements in them. These trademark styles define his movies and make them significant enough for people to be able to tell that the film was directed by him just by watching those specific scenes . One of his most commonly used styles is the freeze frame shot. A freeze frame is a shot when the film is paused at that one shot for a period of time. In Martin Scorsese’s movies, the freeze frames are usually followed by a voiceover, most likely of the protagonist, explaining the situation. In his movie Goodfellas, the freeze frame comes after the part where three gangsters stop the car only to open the trunk, revealing a kidnapped man. They then stab and shoot him to ensure that he is dead. At this point, the voiceover explains that one of the gangsters, the one in the shot at that point, is him and states that he is and always wanted to be a gangster. He uses a freeze frame at this point to draw our attention and introduce us to the protagonist of the film.

Opening scene freeze frame of protagonist

Opening scene freeze frame of protagonist

In other scene of Goodfellas, Martin Scorsese uses a freeze frame while the protagonist is being physically beaten and abused by his father. During the freeze frame, he uses the voiceover to express the opinions of the protagonist as it cannot be done in that scene while he was being beaten, which is an effective way to help explain and get the audience following along with the plot. In our future films, I feel that we can incorporate freeze frames like the ones used by Martin Scorsese in similar scenarios to either advance the plot of the story or maybe even just to emphasize on the emotions and facial expressions of a character. Either way, freeze frame is a new and different type of technique I have learnt from Martin Scorsese that can help make my future films more interesting.



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