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Director Training: Report on Christopher Nolan’s Directing Style

Posted by on May 20, 2015 in Directing, Resource | Comments Off on Director Training: Report on Christopher Nolan’s Directing Style

Director Training: Report on Christopher Nolan’s Directing Style

For the purposes of the course, training and assessment in the ‘directing’ category have to do with aspects of ‘mise-en-scéne’ and directing actors. Training for directors may include: an examination and report on a director’s style. [Image 1: Christopher Nolan] For the final digital filming project, I was assigned as the first-unit director. A very simple definition of my job is to be the director’s assistant, listening to every single one of her orders and taking charge when the director is missing, along with completing over trivial tasks. For training, there are 6 categories: directing, cinematography, editing, sound, scriptwriting, special effects. Since there is no exact category for me to work in, I decided to do a training in directing, as I am also partially a director, and I have a extremely high interest in studying actual renowned hollywood directors. In the start of the year, we were told to write down our favourite movie, and my favourite movie was Inception. Inception had a crazy plot as the film explored the boundaries between reality and imagination. However, I did not have a clue for who directed this film. As I did some research, I realised it was Christopher Nolan. He is considered as one of the most popular directors of this era, as he directed the Batman Trilogy, and Memento, and Interstellar. Interstellar was also another crazy movie that incorporated physics concepts that I have a strong passion in. Thus, I have decided to heavily analyse Christopher Nolan’s directing style and learn his secrets of captivating the world’s attention. Christopher Nolan is from London. His father is from United Kingdom, while his mother is from United States. He had both citizenships, and he began making films at an extremely early age of 7 using his father’s Super 8 camera. Star Wars was Nolan’s inspirations and at the age of 8, he created a stop animation (which I was learning in second semester of high school year), named Space Wars. He earned his college education in Haileybury and Imperal Service College and University College London. He was the president of the Union’s Film Society. Having a close look at his early life, it can be noticed that he had a very strong passion for filming ever since he was young, but there is no noticeable trait that discerns him from other directors and of how his directing style came to be. What marks Nolan different from other directors is that Nolan took a different path and tried out and explored different styles of filming. For classic hollywood cinemas there is known to be a certain style of filming called the CHC filming. Although Nolan stuck purely to his filming style in the start, this filming style later had a very large impact on him in the later films. What CHC filming style is that it has a special way of having the audience watch the films, forgetting that they are actually watching them. The audience would feel like they are actually involved and is in part of the movie. This filming style is created by a principle known as continuity editing, also known as “the invisible style”. This CHC film style was introduced in 1927-1963 and is still used widely by many directors, and what helped Hollywood earn so much...

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Mark’s Experiment with Lens Whacking

Posted by on May 8, 2015 in Cinematography, Training Exercises | Comments Off on Mark’s Experiment with Lens Whacking

In this training, I experimented of “Lens Whacking”, which involves filming a video while having the lens detached from the camera, but held in front of it by hand. it can create some focus shifting effects along with flare effects.  

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3D Text Example

Posted by on May 8, 2015 in Editing, Resource, Special Effects | Comments Off on 3D Text Example

By Jun Sik Yoon   The Actual Tutorial

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Henry’ 8 Hour Challenge Film

Posted by on May 8, 2015 in Sample Posts, Uncategorized, Video Inspiration | Comments Off on Henry’ 8 Hour Challenge Film

This is a video showing Henry and his group’s 8 Hour Challenge film in the film festival. It’s about “Drunk in Shanghai” It’s really cool, please watch! Drunk in Shanghai_1 Link to the Video: http://videonew.saschina.org/watch_video.php?v=3B1SKR4RUD9Y

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Henry, Michelle, Jennifer, Nicole’s Ball Animation

Posted by on May 8, 2015 in Sample Posts, Uncategorized, Video Inspiration | Comments Off on Henry, Michelle, Jennifer, Nicole’s Ball Animation

Hi, here’s our little video of awesome animated ball bouncing video! http://thestudio.carrotrevolution.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Michelle_Henry_Jennifer_Nicole_BouncingBall1.mp4 Link to...

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Henry K’s Large Space Lighting Tutorial

Posted by on May 8, 2015 in Lighting, Training Exercises, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Henry K’s Large Space Lighting Tutorial

Hi, here’s a little tutorial teaching how to use large space lighting. It is especially meant for the night-time, and with a little smoke effect, but it isn’t shown in this video. Sry, hehe… Link to Video: http://videonew.saschina.org/watch_video.php?v=76SN83OGKDOS   Henry_Koo_3A_Lighting Tutoral

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Costume Design

Posted by on May 5, 2015 in Training Exercises | Comments Off on Costume Design

How to Pick The Right Costume   Color Scheme   First off, the most basic part of choosing a costume is understanding the foundations of clothing, which basically applies to everything in design. What is it? Color scheme.   Often times, color is used to govern possible meanings and feelings. The color helps to accentuate the current emotion of the individual wearing the costume. The colors on the left side of the palette, light green, yellow, orange, light red all convey emotions that may mean vibrancy, passion or energy. For example, by wearing a bright yellow shirt, an individual mimics the effect of the shining sun, positive and radiant. On the contraire, the right side of the palette, blue, green, purple conveys the sense of tranquility, professionalism, or conservativeness. A man wearing a dark blue suit may suggest a sense of reserved dignity, while a bright red suit may suggest energy and youth.   Why is costume important?   As a precursor to any costume construction and design, all costume designers must be aware that the costume he intends for the character to wear is something that the character would actually pick to choose and wear for the character in his or her life.   There are three main reasons why costume is important in film and theatrical performance. tone and style o   Like mentioned previously with the color scheme, the costume helps to convey the emotion the character may be feeling or wishing to portray at the moment. time and place o   The costume does a lot to help establish the setting of a particular film. For example, a Victorian gown will distinctively distinguish itself from a mini skirt. The audience will be able to have a idea of when the film is set without knowing any of the plot or charaters. character information o   A character’s relationship is evident from their costume. The relationship between a boss and a employer can be seen from the clothes they wear in relationship to each other. The CEO of a company would be wearing a suit, while the cubicle worker would only be wearing a dress shirt. The costume also gives intention of the character. A very obvious example, is the military uniform, this may suggest war and brutality.   In conclusion, as important as the cinematography of the film or the directing of the actors, what the actors wear also requires paramount attention and effort. The different effects clothing have on the outcome of a film demonstrates the reason why it is important to have a good costume designer on any good film team.   Bibliography:   Patkar, Mihir. “Learn the Basics of Color Theory to Know What Looks Good” Life Hacker. Web. Jul. 22. 14.   “Costume Design Part 1.” Geneseo. Web. May. 5....

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Soul removal/Energy tutorial v2

Posted by on Mar 30, 2015 in Resource, Special Effects, Training Exercises | Comments Off on Soul removal/Energy tutorial v2

  By: Jun Sik Yoon

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1134: By Winston, Hasumi, Lyndon, Henry, and Mark

Posted by on Mar 30, 2015 in Current Projects, Happening, Uncategorized | Comments Off on 1134: By Winston, Hasumi, Lyndon, Henry, and Mark

1134: By Winston, Hasumi, Lyndon, Henry, and Mark

  After waking up at 11:34 in the morning, a businessman learns that “what comes around, goes around.” Starring: Henry Koo Cinematography by: Winston Chan Directing by: Hasumi Tani Animations/Special Effects by: :Lyndon Fan Editing/Effects by: Mark Lau  ...

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Director’s Style: Wes Anderson -The Grand Budapest Hotel-

Posted by on Mar 18, 2015 in Directing, Training Exercises | Comments Off on Director’s Style: Wes Anderson -The Grand Budapest Hotel-

Director’s Style: Wes Anderson -The Grand Budapest Hotel-

Director’s Style: Wes Anderson -The Grand Budapest Hotel- I’ve recently watched the latest Wes Anderson film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, and I think it is remarkable. The entire film is a feast to the eyes; the visual of the movie is spectacular. My personal opinion, the visual of the film is so outstanding and eye-catching that it covered over the plot line. (Or maybe the plot line is not the focus and it is mainly emphasized on the art and composition of each scene.) Anyhow, there is something unique and distinctive about Wes Anderson’s film and I can’t quite lay my finger upon it. His style is original and unique that it is hard to categorize his film into any particular genre. While watching The Grand Budapest Hotel, I picked up a few Wes Anderson signature film techniques that occurs in his film which makes it so special:   1. Vibrant Color: Every scene in a Wes Anderson movie is like a color palette. The vibrant and rich color of each scene capture the audiences’ eyes. As a viewer of the movie, I admit that the color is a main reason why I enjoyed the film so much. With all the vivid colors, the presentation of each scene becomes more pleasant and amusing for the audience. Top: In this frame, the color scheme is red. Top: In this frame, the color scheme is pink. Top: In this frame, the color scheme is blue. This signature move also occur in other Wes Anderson films like Moonrise Kingdom and Fantastic Mr. Fox. Top: In Moonrise Kingdom the color scheme of this shot is yellow. Top: In Fantastic Mr. Fox the color scheme of this scene is yellow. I think this is a great technique that I can learn and incorporate in to my film. I just need to carefully select the color of the character’s clothing, color of prop, location, and everything that comes into frame. Careful selection of color can establish the mood and atmosphere of the entire film. 2. Perfect Symmetry: Something else I notice while watching The Grand Budapest Hotel is Wes Anderson’s consistent play with perfect symmetry. Many shots in this film presents a perfect symmetry for example this screenshot below: And this image:   Wes Anderson’s incredible dedication to perfect symmetry has helped him develop his unique and distinctive film style. Many directors tend to avoid placing a character or an object in the center of the frame, however Anderson uses this technique boldly, making his film different and more appealing than others. There are researchers claiming that we, human beings, crave for perfect symmetry. Researchers found that both men and women find people with symmetrical face far more appealing than non-symmetrical ones. Our love for symmetry can also be seen through what we define as beauty, for example a butterfly, flowers, snowflakes. 3. Different Aspect Ratios: Wes Anderson shot this film in three different aspect ratios: 1.33, 1.85, and 2.35:1. This is because each aspect ratio is used to represent a certain timeline. This film contains three different timeline: 1985, 1968, and 1932. I think this is a very clever technique to differentiate time. The audience can tell what time period it is just by looking at the framing. Top: This aspect ratio is in...

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